Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Yann Arthus-Bertrand: Fine and Furry Farm Animal Portraits

 
It's been awhile since the Reel Foto blog featured any animals, so this week will be devoted to just that. While the last posts on the subject were focused on strange creatures underwater and close encounters of the wild kind, it's time to come back to those animals that are closer to man's heart. Man's best friend has already graced the Reel Foto blog twice, but nothing has been said of man's other best friends. Photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand seeks to amend that by presenting fine and furry farm animals in all their glory.

Sunday, August 28, 2011

Annie Leibovitz: The Master Of The Portrait


Both Yousuf Karsh and Arnold Newman have rightfully earned their place among the legends of photographic portraiture for their ground-breaking work. Their images continue to be a source of inspiration for this generation's professional photographers. On the other hand, new generations of portrait photographers have to look for a fresh source of inspiration for today's digital age. Fortunately, they don't have to look far in order to see the works of commercial photographer and portraitist Annie Leibovitz.

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Arnold Newman: The Environment Is The Portrait


Right around the same time that photographer Yousuf Karsh was working on his incredibly evocative and minimalist portrait style, another portraitist was taking a different approach. While Karsh relied solely on the subject to bring out the portrait within, fellow portrait photographer Arnold Newman believed that the opposite was true. For Newman, placing equal emphasis on the subject's environment was just as important to producing a great portrait.

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Yousuf Karsh: The Art of Immortality


In the world of photographic portraiture, only a handful of names immediately stand out. Pioneers in the field such as Edward Steichen and Richard Avedon reacted to the times they lived in and were celebrated for coming up with unique yet modern approaches to portrait photography. Today's photographers such as Annie Leibovitz and Platon continue that fine tradition. One name however has been immortalized as the unparalleled inspiration for all photographers, past or present. That name is Yousuf Karsh.

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Gjon Mili and Pablo Picasso: Light Paintings


This past week has seen just a fraction of the awesomeness that comes when one takes inspiration from art while working on photography. From recreating iconic artworks as in the case of RES, or using the old styles of painting to create new portraits as in the case of Eugenio Recuenco, the possibilities are endless. However, you can't talk about art and photography without featuring one of the 20th Century's most influential collaborations between the two fields: Pablo Picasso's Light Paintings or Light Drawings as photographed by Gjon Mili.

Friday, August 19, 2011

Eugenio Recuenco: The Old Ways Are New


Photography imitating art as in the previous post shows modern viewers how the techniques of the old masters are truly deserving of their accolade. While the photographer recreating these masterpieces is to be commended for his effort, most of the time it's the original artist that gets the praise. This is the case when photography directly recreates art instead of being inspired by it. Photographer Eugenio Recuenco takes the latter approach by borrowing the elements of the old ways to create something completely new.

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Raúl Eduardo Stolkiner: Conatus, Past and Present, Art and Photography

Last week's feature on Carl Warner's Foodscapes and Klaus Enrique Gerdes' recreations of Arcimboldo's portraits both show just how much photography is inspired by art. With the theme of art and photography being so popular, it's only natural that the Reel Foto blog should continue to feature photographers and artists with the same passion. Artist Raúl Eduardo Stolkiner, popularly known as RES, fits the bill perfectly.

Sunday, August 14, 2011

Arcimboldo's Portraits of Food by Klaus Enrique Gerdes


Carl Warner's Foodscapes from the previous post has been rightly lauded over the past years, but his was not the first artworks to feature food in such a breathtaking manner. Photographer Klaus Enrique Gerdes takes his cue from the artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo in creating his fanciful portraits using fruits, twigs and flowers.

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Foodscapes by Carl Warner


It's not uncommon to play with your food. Sometimes, (as in photographer Sayaka Minemura's case) you create cute culinary constructions using only what's in front of you. Carl Warner seems to have created a whole new level with his Foodscapes, which are complete landscapes made entirely from food.

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

The Breakfast Project by Sayaka Minemura


Today is the beginning of a new day and a new week, which means it's doubly important to start your day right with a hearty breakfast. For photographer Sayaka Minemura, a hearty breakfast also means one that has a little bit more character and charm like those that are featured in her breakfast project.

Saturday, August 6, 2011

Bill Brandt: The Nude As Landscape


As glamorous and sexy as the human body is, it is only a blank canvas until the artist creates his masterpiece. Whilst, photographers George Hurrell and David LaChapelle drew on familiar poses to create enticing images, Bill Brandt went a different way and created landscapes from nudes.

Thursday, August 4, 2011

David LaChapelle: Forget Glamour, It's All About Sex!


There's no glamour, it's all about sex! Well, at the very least, sex plays a big part in fashion and portrait photographer David LaChapelle extensive commercial work. Some 50 years after the legendary George Hurrell defined the setting for glamour and style, LaChapelle turns it all upside to produce some of the most provocative, ridiculous and beautiful portraits in the industry.

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

George Hurrell: Lights, Camera, Glamour!


Ever since the advent of the motion picture over a hundred years ago, film studios have advertised their movies through billboards, posters and post cards. In order to attract an audience, the faces of the leading lads and ladies of the screen were used for publicity. The more successful films would use images of their stars that were more adventurous, sometimes provocative but almost always glamorous. And in 1930s Hollywood, nobody did glamour better than portrait photographer George Hurrell.